How To Make Velcro Ribbon Belts

How to make ribbon velcro belts via lilblueboo.comThese little belts are easy to make and great for kids because of the velcro closure.  Each belt costs about $2.00 in supplies.

I started with 1″ webbing:

DIY webbing belts via lilblueboo.com

 

CONTINUE READING

Fused Plastic Patchwork Belt (A Tutorial)

Fused Plastic Patchwork Belt (A Tutorial) via lilblueboo.com

I did two projects for this week’s S.Y.T.Y.C. contest entry and had my friends vote on which I should submit…..this was the winner, but I chose the other project instead…..hope I’m not sorry in a week! I’m completely in “gift” mode right now…..and I think this belt would make a great gift for a little girl or boy depending on which kind of plastic you used. It is a very sturdy, functional belt. It would even make a cute dog collar!

I seriously had to eat 4,000 Starbursts and drink 5 2-liter bottles of Diet Orange Crush for this project…but happy to do it!

Step 1: Collect different types of plastic….candy packages, soda labels, etc. You will also need several plain white plastic grocery bags (or partially white).

Fused Plastic Patchwork Belt (A Tutorial) step 1 via lilblueboo.com
Step 2: Cut the plastic grocery bags into 4″ strips. These are going to form a plastic base for your belt.

Fused Plastic Patchwork Belt (A Tutorial) step 2 via lilblueboo.com

Step 3: Create a “sleeve” using parchment paper. (You can also use freezer paper but see directions here) Lay the grocery bag strips on one side of the parchment paper, several strips thick, overlapping them slightly.

Fused Plastic Patchwork Belt (A Tutorial) step 3 via lilblueboo.com
Step 4: Close the sleeve carefully. Iron (no steam, medium setting) along the freezer paper sleeve to melt the bags together. You’ll have to do this for about a minute…. keeping the iron moving slowly at all times. Let your sleeve cool. This is important because plastic tends to curl when it cools. The white plastic grocery bags tend to shrink considerably so check for “voids” or holes..this means your heat setting is too high.

Fused Plastic Patchwork Belt (A Tutorial) step 4 via lilblueboo.com
Step 5: Cut your decorative plastic (i.e. the candy packages or soda labels etc) into 1″ x 4″ strips.

Fused Plastic Patchwork Belt (A Tutorial) step 5 via lilblueboo.com
Step 6: Lay your first strip at an angle, close the sleeve and iron to fuse it to your bottom white layer……

Fused Plastic Patchwork Belt (A Tutorial) step 6 via lilblueboo.com
……after removing the iron I placed a heavy coffee table book on top of the sleeve to make sure the plastic cooled flat.

Fused Plastic Patchwork Belt (A Tutorial) step 6 book via lilblueboo.com
Step 7: Repeat this process for each 1″ plastic strip, alternating designs as you go and overlapping each piece over the previous by 1/8″ to account for shrinking. REpeat until the entire length of plastic is covered.

Fused Plastic Patchwork Belt (A Tutorial) step 7 via lilblueboo.com
Step 8: Cut a piece of cotton canvas webbing the length of your belt. Trim your fused plastic piece to be the same width as the webbing.

Fused Plastic Patchwork Belt (A Tutorial) step 8 via lilblueboo.com
Step 9: Sew the fused plastic piece to the webbing 1/8″ from the edge all the way around.

Fused Plastic Patchwork Belt (A Tutorial) step 9 via lilblueboo.com
Optional Step: Since my belt used “D” rings, the webbing would show when the belt was fastened. I took two of the trim scraps and fused them together to create a piece large enough…….

Fused Plastic Patchwork Belt (A Tutorial) optional step via lilblueboo.com
……to sew to the back of the belt on the end that threads through the “D” rings.

Fused Plastic Patchwork Belt (A Tutorial) sew to the back via lilblueboo.com
Step 10: Zigzag all of the belt edges.Place your D rings on one end of the belt and fold your belt end back. Sew the fold closed. You may have to use a zipper foot here if your D rings get in the way (I had enough room and was able to use the regular foot).

Fused Plastic Patchwork Belt (A Tutorial) step 10 via lilblueboo.com
Finished belt! So cute and funky!

 

Fused Plastic Patchwork Belt (A Tutorial) finished via lilblueboo.com

Fused Plastic Patchwork Belt (A Tutorial) finished 2 via lilblueboo.com
Fused Plastic Patchwork Belt (A Tutorial) finished 3 via lilblueboo.com

 

Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial)

Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) via lilblueboo.com
I have so many ribbon scraps that are under 2″ and I’ve contemplated throwing them out many times. This is what I came up with to use them all up….a ribbon belt. But you could use this technique for tons of other things….a headband, a purse strap, a drink coaster…..I had to narrow it down eventually!
Update: Project time is about 2 hours. Sewing the belt in small increments actually makes it go faster than you think…..

Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) 2 via lilblueboo.com
The belt pictured is reversible to the pink and green jacquard backing.
Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) 3 via lilblueboo.com
I used every ribbon combination imaginable. The more colors, the more interesting. Making the belt I worked in small 6 inch sections and tried to limit the repeat of ribbon throughout.
Grab your scraps and let’s get started!
Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) ribbon combination via lilblueboo.com
Before starting you’ll need the following materials:
:: Ribbon Scraps
:: 1.5″ cotton webbing
:: Dritz Fray Check or thread glue
:: 1.5″ D Rings
:: Coordinating thread
Tools needed: sewing machine and scissors
Before starting you’ll also have to measure your waist or hip area….(where you like for your belt to sit) and add 8″ to that measurement.
Step 1: Cut your cotton webbing for your belt length based on the measurement above.
Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) step 1 via lilblueboo.com
Step 2: Take scrap pieces of ribbon and line up next to each other on your cotton webbing. You can pin the ribbon……
Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) step 2 via lilblueboo.com
…..but it is easiest just to put each ribbon on one at a time as you sew down the side of the cotton webbing (about 1/8″ from the edge of the belt). Just make sure to leave your needle down when you lift the foot up to place the next ribbon. Stop once you get 6 or 7 inches of ribbons added (I refer to these as your “short” ribbons). This 6 to 7 inch length is about all that is manageable to weave at one time.
Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) step 3 via lilblueboo.com
Step 3: Place 2 to 3 ribbons perpendicular to the ribbons you just sewed on (I refer to these as your “long” ribbons). Sew these ribbons onto the cotton webbing.
Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) step 4 via lilblueboo.com
Step 4: Weave the long ribbons over and under the short ribbons.
Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) step 5 via lilblueboo.com
Step 4: Making sure all the ribbons fit tightly together, sew the other end of the long ribbon pieces to secure them to the belt.
Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) step 6 via lilblueboo.com
Step 5: Carefully sew the short ribbons securely to the belt (about 1/8″ from the edge of the belt).
Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) step 7 via lilblueboo.com
Step 6: Trim your shorter ribbons on each side so that they are flush with the cotton webbing….
Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) step 8 via lilblueboo.com
…..and trim your longer ribbons leaving about 1/4″.
Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) step 9 via lilblueboo.com
Step 7: Repeat all of the previous steps starting with laying a piece of short ribbon over the 1/4″ ends that were just trimmed. Continue until you have another 6 to 7 inch length of short ribbons sewn on to the belt.
Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) step 10 via lilblueboo.com
Step 8: Add your 2 to 3 longer ribbons by sewing directly over the stitch that secured the previous long ribbons. Then trim these ends to about 1/8″.
Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) step 11 via lilblueboo.com
Note: In between steps you might want to add Fray Check to your ribbon edges if they start to unravel.

Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) step 12 via lilblueboo.com
My assistant was a huge help in picking out each sequence of ribbons.
Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) step 13 via lilblueboo.com
Step 9: Use a zigzag stitch to sew all the edges of the belt.
Optional: I cut a long piece of ribbon jacquard (1″ shorter than my belt length to leave room for the D rings) to sew onto the back of the belt for decoration and attached it with the zigzag stitch.

Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) step 14 via lilblueboo.com
Step 10: Place your D rings on one end of the belt…..
Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) step 15 via lilblueboo.com
……and fold your belt end back, and sew the fold closed. You may have to use a zipper foot here if your D rings get in the way (I had enough room and was able to use the regular foot).
Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) step 16 via lilblueboo.com
Step 11: Trim any frayed edges or threads and add thread glue or Fray check where needed.
Scrap Ribbon Belt (A Tutorial) step finished via lilblueboo.com

My New Favorite "Fused-Plastic" Belt and How I Made It…..

How to make a fused plastic belt - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Ok, it is my ONLY fused plastic belt, but I’m loving it. I made one for Sienna too but I ordered a vintage “seat belt” buckle for it, so I’ll post photos of hers when finished.
Fused plastic belt - DIY Tutorial 1 via lilblueboo.com
I was brainstorming ways to recycle the rice bags we use in a fun way (we eat a lot of rice and stir-fry)….. and I remembered some fused plastic products I had seen. That gave me the idea that I could use the plastic bag fusing to “thicken” my rice bag enough to be durable, as well as make it opaque enough so the writing would show up. I wasn’t sure how it would turn out, but this might be one of my favorite projects ever! My husband is waiting for me to make one for him now (with something else besides rice bags)!
Rice bag / sack plastic belt - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Before starting you’ll need the following materials:
:: 1.5″ cotton webbing (or polyester or nylon)
:: Plastic grocery bags or other plastic packaging
:: Fray Check or thread glue
:: Belt buckle (I took one off an old belt)
:: 3/16″ metal eyelets and eyelet tool (make sure your belt prong will fit through this size)
:: Coordinating thread (and heavy duty thread if you have it around)
Tools needed: sewing machine, scissors, and hammer
Before starting you’ll also have to measure your waist or hip area….(where you like for your belt to sit) and add 8″ to that measurement. This is your “belt length” that I refer to in this tutorial.
Step 1: Cut your top layer plastic (for me it was a rice bag) into 2″ strips making sure to concentrate on the areas that are most interesting. Note: Some plastics shrink more than others, so you may need to test some first. The rice bags are perfect because they barely shrink at all.
Step 1 Cutting - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Step 2: Cut a piece of freezer paper slightly longer than your belt length, fold it in half, waxy sides together…..
Step 2 Ironing Cover - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
…..and then fold it in half again. This is going to be your ironing “pocket” to melt your plastic in.
Step 3 Ironing Cover - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Step 3: Take several plastic grocery bags…..
Regular Plastic Bags - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
…and cut them into 2.5″ strips. I only used the white parts for my belt because my design was dependent on the colors of the rice bag and I didn’t want other colors showing through.
Cut Regular Plastic Bags - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Step 4: Open the freezer paper “sleeve” (no waxy portion should be showing) and lay the grocery bag strips on one side, several strips thick, overlapping them slightly.
Step 4 Place Plastic in Sleeve - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Step 5: Lay your top layer of plastic (for my project it was the rice bag strips) on top of the grocery bag strips, overlapping the strips about 1/2 inch. You’ll lay enough of these strips to create the length of your belt.
Place 2nd Layer Plastic in Sleeve - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Step 6: Close the sleeve carefully making sure that the strips do not shift any……
Close Sleeve - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
….and iron (no steam, medium setting) along the freezer paper sleeve to melt the bags together. You’ll have to do this for about a minute…. keeping the iron moving slowly at all times.
Let your sleeve cool. This is important** because plastic tends to curl when it cools.
**Note: The thick double freezer paper sleeve will help your plastic stay flat as it cools. Because of the thickness though you’ll need to check to make sure all the plastic melted. If not, close the sleeve again and repeat your ironing.
Ironing Plastic Bag to Melt - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Step 6: The white plastic grocery bags tend to shrink considerably so check for “voids” like below (which means your iron was probably a little too hot)……
Too much heat - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
….but you can place more plastic grocery bag layers under that area and re-iron to fill it in.
Too much heat add more plastic - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Step 6: Cut a piece of cotton webbing as long as your belt length. You can use cotton, nylon, polyester webbing, or even jacquard…. whatever your preference.
Cotton Webbing - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Use a long straight edge to cut one side of your fused plastic piece…….
Cut - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
…..and then measure from that side 1 3/8″ so that your resulting plastic “belt” is 1/8″ smaller than your webbing width.
Measure - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Here is what my two pieces looked like before I attached them together.
Pieces before sewn together - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Step 7: Place your plastic belt piece on top of the webbing (I don’t pin them, it jacks it all up), and sew carefully down one side. 

Note:  You’ll want to use a longer stitch than normal (I use a 7 on my machine). A short stitch will weaken the plastic by punching holes too close together.
Sew using longer stitch - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
One side attached:
One side attached - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Step 8: Carefully stitch the other side of your belt and you’ll have the main belt piece finished!
Other side attached - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Step 9: Notch both ends of your belt piece as shown below and zig-zag stitch the edges so that it won’t fray. I also like to coat the ends in Fray Check or thread glue.
Note: If you are using nylon, you can use a match to seal the ends.
Notch both ends - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Step 10: Cut a 1/2″ slit in one side of your belt for the buckle prong….
Cut slit - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
….and finish the edges using a narrow zig zag stitch. Be careful not to sew the hole closed!
Cut slit finsih with zig zag stitch - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Step 11: Insert your buckle prong through the hole……
Insert buckle - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
…..and sew the end of the belt backwards by hand using a needle. I used a heavy duty thread for this step.
Sew buckle - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Step 12: Try on the belt and see where the buckle prong will hit and mark this spot and mark 2 other points at 1″ increments from each side so you have a total of 5 holes marked.
Try on for buckle prong - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Step 13: At each of the holes marked, take the a sharp object such as scissors to poke/cut large enough holes through so that you can fit one of your 3/16″ metal eyelets through.
Note: Try to disturb as little of the fibers as possible so the holes won’t fray and weaken.
poke holes - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Place the other side of the eyelet in place……
Add eyelet - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
……and use a hammer and your eyelet tool to lock the eyelet in place. Repeat for each eyelet.
Hammer eyelet in place - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
And you are done!
I had the HARDEST time getting a photo of the belt myself since my husband was at work. I don’t trust my 2-year-old with my camera….no way. Here was the first attempt….using a mirror:
Note: I am not 7 feet tall….I was standing on a stool. Please don’t send emails asking if my inseam is 64 inches.
Tada! Done!  - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Then I went outside and took some by pointing my camera backward….it worked a little. Good thing I have long arms….
Tada! Done close up - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Fi
And finally I gave up and just took photos of the belt…..
Finished - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Finished 2 - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Finished 3 - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Finished 4 - DIY Tutorial via lilblueboo.com
Pheww….that post took a while! Now I’m off to straighten up the house… and maybe get back in the painting studio, I’ve got a portrait to work on!

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